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Friday Win your Week-

How 2 Change and Win

Thank you for joining us on our journey of How Women Win Our Way and continuing to G.I.V.E.H.O.P.E. to women across the world!

 

One important question we’ve asked our women is How 2 Change and Win. Listen as we hear answers from our CHAMP10N Guests as followed: 

Melissa Luellen, Auburn University Head Women’s Golf Coach

Angie Akers, Retired Professional Beach Volleyball Player and Coach of the Women's Beach Volleyball Olympic Team

Carli Synder, Professional Volleyball Player and Former NCAA Athlete for the University of Florida

 

Stay tuned NEXT FRIDAY to hear more compiled answers to How Women Win Our Way.

Want to G.I.V.E.H.O.P.E. to other women by sharing how you win? 

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Anne Walker,

Head Women's Golf Coach for

Stanford University

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. It is not just women coaches that at times experience difficulties with balancing a family and their job; this happens to women across the globe in their own unique situations and professions. Being able to recognize the importance of this balance and respecting the decisions of these women is essential to allowing them to have it all, whatever that may be.

  2. Engage and Empower your Support Team. Come together with the strength of being able to rely on each other rather than having one person dominate all categories. How do we change the management of expectations and instead anchor in the Power of Team to enter into high performance? How can you win as a coach and as a human? It is difficult to go through all of these things alone – having good assistant coaches and volunteers is essential when unexpected situations arise. 

  3. Generally, women often over perform and outwork themselves to prove themselves as a female in their respective position, whereas males are often overconfident to begin with and immediately trusted by those surrounding them. The women do not get that trust right away; they need to prove it, often to an overextending amount, while males can enter into a position with high expectations regardless of their performance or previous experience. Additionally, when women receive the validation of being great or excelling at their position, they often do not accept it and keep pushing above and beyond.

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Erin Lindsey,

Head Women's Volleyball Coach

for Santa Clara University 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. On average, many women need to feel satisfied within their career and that they are actually making a difference in others’ lives. Chasing the money and focusing on the financials may create a feeling of emptiness and not allow you to be your true self. Let’s change the way society thinks about the head of household gender dynamics. Women can be the breadwinner of their families, and it can be just as justified for women to take a job somewhere else and have the rest of the family move along with them for that job - these things do not just happen to men, 

  2. Speak up for what you want, but remember - you can always change your mind. If you try something and it’s not for you, why continue doing it if the benefits don't outweigh the disadvantages? For women, these family dynamics can look a lot different across the board. Some families want children, some don’t, some want to stay home, some want to keep working - having these conversations within your own family and making sure gender stereotypes do not completely control the situation is a great winning strategy for living your best life.

  3. Empower your own female players to have these conversations with themselves. Most of the time, we are not aware of our own gender expectations, especially when we are younger. Giving your players the insight of what this means and your own experiences with them will help make these younger females aware of societal norms and how they have more control than they think.

howwomenwin.com

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Friday Win the Week-10 Talks with

Erin Lindsey,

Head Women's Volleyball Coach

for Santa Clara University

Credentials: Erin's 10 Moments:

  • Volleyball Coaching History

    • 2019 – Present, Head Coach – Santa Clara University

    • 2017 – 2019, Assistant Coach – Stanford University

    • 2016 – 2017, Assistant Coach – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    • 2011 – 2016, Head Coach – Dartmouth College

    • 2005 – 2010, Assistant Coach – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

      • Helped develop 3 AVCA All-Americans and 7 All-ACC players

      • Recruited 3 AVCA All-Region and All-ACC players

  • Volleyball Player at UNC at Chapel Hill

    • 4-year starter and 2 -time captain

    • All-ACC honors

    • 2-time AVCA All-Region accolades

    • Conference Player of the year

  • Education

    • 2011 – MA, Sport Administration, UNC at Chapel Hill

    • 2000 – BA, Exercise and Sport Science, UNC at Chapel Hill 

 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. Expectations play a big role in how players perceive their coaches. Athletes will have gendered expectations based on whether they are male or female and respond differently based on these expectations. As coaches, it is important to know yourself and how you coach so you are able to tackle these expectation biases and be transparent in what you will give to your athletes rather than getting trapped in these stereotypes.

  2. Without young women having a female coach as a role model, many female athletes may have the desire to be coached by men due to the stereotypes that exist of male coaches pushing them hard compared to females who stereotypically formulate relationships and show their care for their players. Not all coaches are like this - it is a stereotype - however, since these exist, it is important to find your own coaching philosophy, whether it falls into these stereotypes or not, so you can find the players that are a good fit for your program.

  3. There are a lot of societal expectations for how each gender should act in a marital relationship. Some men may feel obligated to be the breadwinner of the family due to these norms, though it can assuredly be the women as well. If a female coach has a higher salary, it can bring up difficult conversations when it comes to moving or children. Additionally, being a female coach with children posits curiosity from administrators, whether it be simply on the stereotyped precedent that you are a woman or because they are trying to formulate a relationship with you and create open communication when seeking time for family. 

howwomenwin.com

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Friday Win the Week-10 Talks with

Anne Walker,

Head Women's Golf Coach

for Stanford University

Credentials: Anne's 10 Moments:

  • Stanford University

    • 2018 NCAA Semi-Finalist

    • 2017 NCAA Semi-Finalist

    • 2016 NCAA Runner-up

    • 2015 NCAA Champions

  • University of California, Davis

    • 2008-2012 Head Golf Coach

  • University of California, Berkeley

    • 2006-2008 Associate Head Golf Coach

    • 2002 B.A., Geography w/Honors

  • Concordia University-Irvine

    • 2011 M.A., Coaching and Athletic Administration

 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. Limit head games when there are big decisions to be made with your athletes; female athletes on average will fill that void themselves with negative rumination. Speak with individuals alone and in person prior to making a big team announcement so they can be more emotionally prepared for that announcement within the group setting. Cultivate an open and communicative environment where athletes feel comfortable coming to you when they do not understand a decision or want more information about how they can improve their game. They may not like the answers that they get, but at least they will walk away understanding your reasoning behind your coaching.

  2. It’s okay to be competitive; however, it is how you channel your competitiveness that matters. It could be your worst enemy, or it could be one of your best qualities as a player and as a teammate. We do not have control over a lot of things within sport. Take your competitiveness and use it when examining your own personal process goals. Make sure these goals are personal rather than outcome based, or players will begin to focus on the wrong things when practicing for game days.

  3. The system of coaching is not setting up women coaches for success. To have a family of their own and run their own team of players and other coaches on their staff is quite a battle. Many women stop coaching in order to put their family ahead of everything else, giving up their career and something they desire to do. Ask for what you need and try changing the system one commitment at a time.

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Cassidy Lichtman,

Professional

Volleyball Player

and Founder of Non-Profit

Progress Through Athletics -P/ATH.

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. Honor what is important to you, especially from a place of curiosity. Women have a tendency to have the desire to start with grace; they know they do not know everything, and everybody is a learner. Asking the right questions without being defensive or accusatory will help everyone to learn about whatever the topic is rather than making it all about you.

  2. Leave a legacy that you will be proud of. Many coaches have the ability to reignite the passion they have for the sport strong enough for next-gens to be able to do what they do as coaches. Especially when coaching women, it is important to allow them the opportunity to grow as a leader to be able to coach both women and men.

  3. Use your passion to step into the change that matters to you. If there are experiences you wish you could change from a coaching perspective, be the change that you want to see in the world. Use what you have learned from past experiences and take it to the next level. 

howwomenwin.com

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Friday Win the Week-10 Talks with

Cassidy Lichtman,

Professional Volleyball Player

and Founder of the Non-Profit

P/ATH- Progress through Athletics

Credentials: Cassidy's 10 Moments:

  • USA Volleyball Athlete

    • 2015 Pan American Cup (Gold)

    • 2014 Pan American Cup (Silver)

    • 2013 Pan American Cup (Gold)

    • 2012 Pan American Cup (Gold)

    • 2011 Pan American Games (Bronze)

  • Stanford University

    • 2016-17 Assistant Coach

    • 2007-2010 Player for Stanford Cardinal

      • Competed in 2 Final Fours

      • 4 Consecutive Pac-10 championships

      • 2-time AVCA First Team All-American

      • 3-time All-Pac-10 conference honoree

    • 2007-2011 Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, Political Science, History

  • 2019 – Present, USA Volleyball Board of Directors

  • 2020 – Present, Professional Athlete – Athletes Unlimited

  • 2019 – Present, Founder of P/ATH, nonprofit

 

 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. Women coaches coaching women players can often form a stronger relationship with each other since they know where exactly they are coming from with a gender perspective. Ask your players what they think their opinions are, especially as a young girl in order to teach them that their opinion matters and they can formulate one on their own. Helping youth girls in sport will create more pathways for them to follow that into their far future instead of deterring them early. 

  2. Be transparent when it comes to why you are doing what you are doing as a coach. Have a reason and a why behind everything that you do. Not being able to have those conversations with players may lose respect from these athletes and it begins to formulate an environment of arrogance and closed doors. 

  3. Establish the standard and protect the culture. Communicating these expectations early in the season will make conflict resolutions flow much easier when it arises later on. If conflict does come up, players can remind each other of the standard and what is expected of them at the program they are competing in. The coach can also step in if it becomes necessary. Make sure to repeat these expectations throughout the season, not just one and done.

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Sharon Clark,

Butler University

Head Women's Volleyball Coach

and President of the

American Volleyball  

Coach's Association 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. The male system is based on hierarchy. The female system is based on a web of interconnected relationships. Men can often go back and forth at each other on the court or field and be completely fine afterwards, whereas women may encounter similar disputes and the damage within the team will still be occurring weeks later. 

  2. As women, when we get hurt, we either withdraw or attack; however, as women we have also been socialized not to attack. Anger and aggressiveness is penalized within the female paradigm. If you are hurt, you bury it and do not express any type of aggressive feelings. We must teach our athletes how to healthily express aggression between each other as well as how to emotionally accept aggression directed at you. 

  3. What do you want and what is your plan to get there? As a coach, it is your job to help athletes discover this within themselves, either as an athlete or also as a person depending on your coaching style. For athletes, coaches cannot decide these things themselves. They may have an idea of where they want you to end up in your career, but without your own personal goals and desired outcomes, it will be a struggle getting there.

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Carli Snyder,

International Professional Volleyball Player

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. Ask a lot of questions as a player. Show your interest in growing and learning, especially when playing at the next highest level. Find the time to invest in your own development as a player and as a person. From a coaching perspective, give these kids the opportunity to boost this by aiding in identity development and what they are working towards in the role that they hold.

  2. What are the things that make you feel good in your sport? Playing at an elite level comes with a lot of pressure and stress. You must fight every day in practice and games to play your best, and a lot of failure is going to show up; sometimes constantly. Find short term wins that you can measure versus being so results oriented.

  3. Communicate with your athletes the reasoning behind your decisions you make. Athletes will need to retrain their brains when they come in at a higher level of sport and all of a sudden are not the best player on their team anymore. Help them fit into your program to rise up when failure or change comes up and to be on the same page throughout this development. 

howwomenwin.com

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Friday Win the Week-10 Talks with

Carli Snyder,

International Professional

Volleyball Player

Credentials: Carli's 10 Moments:

  • Professional Volleyball Experience

    • 2021-2022 RC Cannes

    • 2020-2021 VB Nantes

    • 2018-2020 ASPTT Mulhouse

  • 2018 University of Florida graduate, International Studies

  • 2014-2018 University of Florida

    • 2017 AVCA All-America Second Team

    • 2017 VolleyballMag.com All-America Second Team

    • 2015 & 2016 AVCA All-America Honorable Mention

    • Three-time AVCA All-Southeast Region (2015-17)

    • 2016, 2017 All-SEC

    • 2017 SEC Fall Academic Honor Roll

    • 2014-15 SEC First-Year Academic Honor Roll

 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. How does struggle create success? Struggling to fail will show up for many people in collegiate sports, especially at the beginning of your career when you are trying to gain trust from your teammates and coaches. Rewire your brain to feel a sense of reward when something feels right, even when it does not appear right to other players. Do your job that your coach gives you and the rest will fall into place.

  2. How do you train with purpose and passion? Treat your team how you would your family. Have conversations about what your desired outcomes are and how you will get there. Express your love for each other and recognize that the struggle everyone is going through is going to push you to your best. Be together as one. 

  3.  How do you change and win? Winning can be short term or long term, and it is important to have goals within both of those categories. It is based on your own definition of winning, so be sure to create that definition to have clear cut goals that are attainable for your future. 

howwomenwin.com

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Friday Win the Week-10 Talks with

Sharon Clark,

Butler University

Head Women's Volleyball Coach

and President of the

American Volleyball

Coaches Association

Credentials: Sharon's 10 Moments:

  • Butler Volleyball All-Time Wins Leader

  • Seven 20-Win seasons at Butler

  • 12 Winning Seasons at Butler

  • 2010 NCAA Tournament Appearance

  • University of California-Davis head coach with 97 wins.

  • Humboldt State (Arcata, CA) head coach

  • 2005 Graduate of NCAA’s Women Coaches Academy

  • Winner of the NCAA Ethnic Minority Postgraduate Scholarship

  • 1985-1988 Clark played collegiate volleyball at Cal State-Sacramento.

  • 1989 Bachelor of Science degree in education, Cal State-Sacramento

  • 1994 Master’s degree in sports administration, Cal State-Sacramento

 

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. In the coaching arena, men are usually compared to women no matter what the accomplishments are. Due to gender stereotypes and societal norms, men have more room to be more aggressive, assertive, or loud compared to women. When women act this way, it becomes more to do with their gender than it does their coaching abilities. 

  2. How do you recruit? Your ability as a player to have a conversation with a coach will let them know if you are able to come and compete in their program. Being able to be emotionally intelligent when having discussions or interviews with players and looking for signs of what you are looking for is a good way to recruit; you just need to know what you’re looking for. Ask players what coaches they have had in the past and what they liked and didn’t like about those individuals.

  3. Continue to groom women into coaching. At the youth level, girls learn at a very early age to be more coddled and less critiqued than men because of gender stereotypes of being too ‘weak’ or unable to handle it emotionally. Teaching them young that women are just as able to be coached by other women as they are men will help them to become more open to feedback and be able to be coached by people who will not sugarcoat things.

howwomenwin.com

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Women Winning Wednesday-

10 Talks with

Carlette Patterson and

Kathleen J. DeBoer

Carlette and Kathy discuss

How Women Win

after hearing from

Melissa Leullen,

Auburn University

Head Women's Golf Coach

WINNING STRATEGIES

  1. The relatability aspect has been emphasized throughout many of our conversations with women coaches and athletes. Having a relationship with your coach or athlete is important to many females within the sports industry, whereas with men, it is more transactional. “Women must bond to battle, and men must battle to bond” -Kathleen DeBoer. If men are presented with a secure opportunity to get better at their craft, they will invest what they need in order to get to where they want to be. On the other hand, women are more thorough with who they work with and are less transactional in these relationships.